Large Format Film Technology

TO THE LIMITS OF PERIPHERAL VISION

Large format theaters all project a crystal clear image that stretches to the limits of ones' peripheral vision, but the image projection can vary in several ways. Some screens are "dome" shaped with a screen that curves around the viewers nearly 180 degrees, while others employ a "flat" screen that can stretch up to eight stories tall. Some theaters are also equipped to project films in 3D. All theaters have comfortable stadium-style seats and six channel digital surround sound to complement the visual experience.

10 TIMES THE IMAGE QUALITY

The images projected onto large format screens emanate from 70mm film frames that boast nearly 10 times the image resolution of the 35mm film that is projected in your standard neighborhood cinemas. This allows for an exceptionally large projected image size while maintaining unmatched clarity and depth of field.

QUALITY STARTS WITH THE CAMERAS

Large format cameras are an integral part of the filmmaking process. They are extremely robust, designed to withstand the most severe shooting conditions. They also have to be robust to shoot the standard 24 frames per second of the enormous 70mm/15 perforation-wide film—that works out to 334 feet per minute rolling past the lens! Unfortunately, this also means that a standard canister, holding 1000 feet of film, only lasts 3 minutes. And the cameras are also capable of shooting at 48 frames per second, creating a slow-motion effect when projected — a nice effect, but one that limits the cinematographer to just 90 seconds of film per canister.

BIGGER FILM MEANS BIGGER EVERYTHING

The larger film that necessitates the larger cameras in turn leads to uniquely large and time consuming requirements throughout the filmmaking processfrom 800m lenses the size of the cameraman to specials mounts for helicopter aerials and massive data storage requirements for computer effects. It also requires special considerations and an experienced perspective when editing the film electronically on small computer screens.